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Estate Planning For Life's Stages

Estate Planning Attorney
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We see it in our clients faces when they first come in.  We hear it in their voices. They are unsure of how to start estate planning and worried of missteps that will prove costly.   We know you are looking for a solution that works. We understand that being trusted with your family’s estate plan is an honor and we are committed to getting it right.  We understand what’s at stake.  We’ve been trusted for over 20 years to provide complete estate plans that work for family’s all over southwest Missouri.   You need an estate planning solution.

Revocable living trust

Drawn up properly, a revocable trust (a trust you can always change) makes it easy to keep control of your finances, and when appropriate,  let a trusted person step-in and ensure fewer problems for your heirs when you die. Trusts are an estate planning solution for many. How about you?

Now, if you just saw the word “trust” and thought, “Okay, Karen.  That’s just for rich people,” you couldn’t be more wrong. A trust is a solution for many when estate planning. A revocable living trust is an incredibly powerful estate planning tool that can be a big help in making sure your priorities are met and your goals achieved. You remain in control of all your finances as long as you want, and you can make changes to your trust as often as you want. That’s what “revocable” means.

To deal with the possibility that you become unable to manage your finances, the trust lets someone you’ve appointed take over (and specifies who gets to determine whether you’re incapacitated). This will save a loved one from the time-consuming inconvenience of getting the paperwork for handling your financial accounts.

And when you do die, your family will have an easier time passing assets in the trust to your beneficiaries. Otherwise, they’ll have to deal with probate, which can be a lengthy, expensive process if you die with a will only — or without a will.

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